Access Denied: Avoiding & Defending the Expanding Field of ADA Claims

$145.00

CLE Credits earned: 1.5 GENERAL (or 1.5 LAW & LEGAL for WA state)

An overview of current and developing accessibility issues and trends, including identifying litigation risks, best practices to avoid litigation, and how to effectively defend accessibility claims.

This course is co-sponsored with myLawCLE.

Key topics to be discussed:

•   Physical accessibility issues
•   Communicative and website accessibility issues
•   Creating a corporate infrastructure to maintain a compliant environment
•   Accessibility litigation matters

Date / Time: November 19, 2019

•   2:00 pm – 3:30 pm Eastern
•   1:00 pm – 2:30 pm Central
•   12:00 pm – 1:30 pm Mountain
•   11:00 am – 12:30 pm Pacific

Choose a format:

•   Live Video Broadcast/Re-Broadcast: Watch Program “live” in real-time, must sign-in and watch program on date and time set above. May ask questions during presentation via chat box. Qualifies for “live” CLE credit.
•   On-Demand Video: Access CLE 24/7 via on-demand library and watch program anytime. Qualifies for self-study CLE credit. On-demand versions are made available 7 business days after the original recording date and are view-able for up to one year.

Select your state to see if this class is approved for CLE credit.

Choose the format you want.

Clear

Original Broadcast Date: July 19, 2019

Matt Kenefick, Esq. is a partner at Jeffer Mangels Butler & Mitchell, LLP, based out of the San Francisco Office. His practice areas include litigation and compliance, with a significant portion of that work relating to accessibility matters. His clients range from small businesses and individuals, to Fortune 500 companies.

Prior to becoming a lawyer, Matt worked his way through college in heavy equipment. Matt is a proud father and in his spare time, Matt enjoys spending time with his family, travel, golf, outdoors and wildlife photography. Prior to joining JMBM, Matt performed volunteer legal work at Legal Advocates for Children and Youth, East San Jose Community Law Center, and the Santa Clara County Public Defender’s Office.

Accreditation Policy
myLawCLE seeks accreditation for all programs in all states. (Accreditation for paralegals sought thru NALA and NFPA paralegal associations.) Each attending attorney/paralegal will receive a certificate of completion following the close of the CLE program as proof of attendance. In required states, myLawCLE records attorney/paralegals attendance, in all other states attorney/paralegal is provided with the approved CLE certificate to submit to their state bar or governing association.

    Automatic MCLE Approvals

All myLawCLE CLE programs are accredited automatically either directly or via reciprocity in the following states: AK, AR, CA, CT, FL, HI, ME, MO, MT, ND, NH, NM, NJ, NY, WV, and VT. (AZ does not approve CLE programs, but accepts our certificates for CLE credit.)

    Live Video Broadcasts

Live video broadcasts are new live CLE programs being streamed and recorded for the first time. All of these programs qualify for “Live” CLE credit in all states except NV, OH, MS, IN, UT, PA, GA, SC, and LA —these states require in-person attendance to qualify for “Live” CLE credit.

    “Live” Re-Broadcasts

“Live” Re-broadcasts are replays of previous recorded CLE programs, set on a specific date and time and where the original presenting speakers calls in live at the end of the event to answer questions. This “live” element allows for “live” Re-broadcast CLEs to qualify for “Live” CLE credits in most states. [The following states DO NOT allow for “live” CLE credits on re-broadcast CLEs: NV, OH, MS, IN, UT, PA, GA, SC, and LA]

Reciprocity
Many states allow for credit to be granted on a 1:1 reciprocal basis for courses approved in another mandatory CLE jurisdiction state. This is known as a reciprocity provision and includes the following states: AK, AR, HI, CT, FL, ME, MO, MT, ND, NH, NM, VT, NJ, NY, and WV. myLawCLE does not seek direct accreditation of live webinars or teleconferences in these states.

Section I. Overview of accessibility laws

Section II. Current trends in accessibility litigation

Section III. Best practices to avoid and respond to accessibility claims