Wearable Technology: Key Legal Implications

$195.00

Re-Broadcast on August 15, 2017

This course will go over the key legal implications of wearable technology. From privacy, to intellectual property, and workplace considerations, the speaker will discuss the essential legal framework controlling the use of wearables, and the collection of data from users of wearables. Additional considerations include consumer product safety issues and sourcing, import and customs considerations.

This course is co-sponsored by Wolters Kluwer.

Key topics to be discussed:

  • Intellectual property
  • Privacy
  • Employment considerations
  • Labor considerations
  • Product liability

Date / Time: August 15, 2017

  • 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm Eastern
  • 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm Central
  • 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm Mountain
  • 11:00 am – 1:00 pm Pacific

Choose a format:

  • Live Video Broadcast/Re-Broadcast: Watch Program “live” in real-time, must sign-in and watch program on date and time set above. May ask questions during presentation via chat box. Qualifies for “live” CLE credit.
  • On-Demand Video: Access CLE 24/7 via on-demand library and watch program anytime. Qualifies for self-study CLE credit. On-demand versions are made available 7 business days after the original recording date and are view-able for up to one year.

 

Clear

Re-Broadcast on August 15, 2017

oliveraOlivera Medenica is a Principal at Medenica Law PLLC. Olivera’s practice focuses on both transactional and litigation issues faced by businesses in a variety of industries from media, hospitality, and fashion to consulting, retail and telecommunication. She regularly counsels her clients on trademark, copyright, business licensing and disputes as well as business agreements, social/digital media, and client strategic counseling. In her litigation practice, she counsels her clients on matters such as copyright and trademark infringement, trade secrets, unfair competition, breach of contract, fraud, right of publicity and privacy, defamation, as well as shareholder and business owner disputes in closely held businesses.

Olivera has lectured in a variety of venues on issues dealing with intellectual property, business ownership and disputes, social media, and law firm management issues. Lecture engagements have included Lawline.com, the New York County Lawyers’ Association, the New York City Bar, the New York State Bar Association, Harvard Law School, Brooklyn Law School, New York Law School, South by Southwest Interactive, Cardozo Law School, the School of Visual Arts, Manhattan School of Music, Direct Marketing Association Conference (Geek-End), and the New York Foundation for the Arts.

She has also written articles for a variety of publications including the New York Law Journal, National Law Journal, Ecommerce Law and Strategy, Brooklyn Journal of International Law, Cardozo Arts and Entertainment Law Journal, and Loyola of Los Angeles International and Comparative Law Review and the Internet Law Journal.

Olivera believes that the key to a sound legal practice is to understand legal, ethical and practice management issues relevant to the legal industry and their impact upon the community at large. She has been involved since the start of her career in a variety of bar associations, which has honed her ability to understand the dynamics between effective legal services and community education and welfare. She served as President to the Southern District of New York Chapter of the Federal Bar Association, sat on the board of New York County Lawyers’ Association, and has chaired the Small Law Firm Committee at the New York City Bar. Under her chairmanship, the committee published an innovative report on best practices for small law firms which provides a thorough examination of how small law firms can best serve and benefit their clients through ethically sound and cost effective counseling.

Olivera is admitted in both New York and New Jersey.

CLE Accreditation:
mylawCLE seeks approval in all states except VA.

CLE 2.00 – AK
CLE 2.00 – AL
CLE 2.00 – AR
CLE 2.00 – AZ
CLE 2.00 – CA
CLE 2.40 – CO
CLE 2.00 – DE
CLE 2.40 – FL
CLE 2.00 – GA
CLE 2.00 – HI

CLE 2.00 – IA
CLE 2.00 – ID
CLE 2.00 – IL
CLE 2.00 – IN
CLE 2.00 – KS
CLE 2.00 – KY
CLE 2.00 – LA
CLE 2.00 – ME
CLE 2.00 – MN
CLE 2.40 – MO

CLE 2.00 – MP
CLE 2.00 – MS
CLE 2.00 – MT
CLE 2.00 – NC
CLE 2.00 – ND
CLE 2.00 – NE
CLE 2.00 – NH
CLE 2.40 – NJ
CLE 2.00 – NM
CLE 2.00 – NV

CLE 2.40 – NY
CLE 2.00 – OH
CLE 2.40 – OK
CLE 2.00 – OR
CLE 2.00 – PA
CLE 2.00 – PR
CLE 2.40 – RI
CLE 2.00 – SC
CLE 2.00 – TN
CLE 2.00 – TX

CLE 2.00 – UT
CLE N/A – VA
CLE 2.40 – VI
CLE 2.00 – VT
CLE 2.00 – WA
CLE 2.40 – WI
CLE 2.40 – WV
CLE 2.00 – WY

Accreditation Policy
myLawCLE will seek credit where attending attorneys are primarily licensed for all of its live webinars and live teleconferences, except in states which allow for reciprocity (see reciprocity section below). Credit for CLE in a self-study format is sought for in most states; however, some states do not allow for CLE credit to be earned in a self-study format (see the self-study section below). Many states typically decide whether a program qualifies for MCLE credit in their jurisdiction 4-8 weeks after the program application is submitted. For many live events, credit approval is not received prior to the program. Credit hours granted are subject to approval from each state.

Reciprocity
Additionally, some states allow for credit to be granted on a 1:1 reciprocal basis for courses approved in another mandatory CLE jurisdiction state. This is known as a reciprocity provision and includes the following states: AK, AR, CO, FL, ME, MT, ND, NH, NJ, NY, PR, and SD. myLawCLE does not seek direct accreditation of live webinars or teleconferences in these states.

On-demand CLE
myLawCLE will seek on-demand approval in all states except Virginia and Arkansas (outside reciprocal provisions stated above).


myLawCLE Credit Guarantee
myLawCLE offers a program and credit approval guarantee. If a registered attendee is unhappy with a CLE program they have attended, myLawCLE will offer that attended access to another complimentary CLE or a full refund in order to insure the attendeeís satisfaction.

Additionally, on all online CLE programs application for approval will be made in all states where attending attorneys are primarily licensed in. If a registered attorney does not receive credit from their state for any reason, a full refund will be granted.

Section I. Wearables: What are they? Why are they relevant now?

Section II. Privacy: Privacy risks; significant legal issues; traditional privacy principles; recent developments; privacy best practices

Section III. Intellectual property: Copyright; trademark; patents

Section IV. Workplace considerations: Dual use devices; workplace policies; training

Section V. Consumer product safety

Section VI. Sourcing, import and customs issues